Can I get the vaccine with pre-existing conditions? Should I?

People with certain underlying or pre-existing conditions, including cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, obesity, and heart disease, are more likely to experience severe complications from Covid-19 -- so they're strongly encouraged to get the vaccine.

In clinical trials, the Covid-19 vaccines "demonstrated similar safety and efficacy profiles in persons with some underlying medical conditions" as in patients without pre-existing conditions.

However, if you feel sick with a cold, fever, or other illness -- including Covid-19 -- immediately before a vaccination appointment, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that you should postpone your vaccination until you feel better.

Related Questions
What do I do if I have Covid-19 now?
Adhere To CDC Guidelines If you test positive for Covid-19, the following steps -- outlined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- will help you care for yourself and protect others: Alert close contacts. Tell anyone you have recently come into contact with that you have Covid-19, so they can take the necessary precautions and prevent further spread. If you have concerns about confidentiality, especially in the workplace, check with your employer. Many can notify others…
Where should I go for trusted and up-to-date information on Covid-19 vaccines?
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has great information on the Covid-19 vaccines, including a FAQ page. Another CDC resource will direct you to state Department of Health websites. Those sites will help you determine when you can get the vaccine in your area.
I'm young and healthy. Should I get vaccinated?
While not considered to be at high risk for severe complications from Covid-19, serious cases do occur among younger, healthier people. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also warns of the potential long-term health effects of Covid-19 infection, even for those who experienced mild illness.